BAM Nuttall begins work on East Coast mainline station

31 March 2021 10:20 - BAM Nuttall Ltd
Work on East Coast mainline station

Camberley, 26 March 2021 - BAM Nuttall began construction of the new Reston station in the Scottish Borders this week (24 March) on behalf of Network Rail.

Following successful completion of preparatory work, primarily diverting an existing water main, the site team has now started work to create the embankments for the new station platforms.

It is the first phase of construction activity which will see a station open in the Borders village of Reston for the first time in more than half a century.

The plans for Reston will see the construction of a two-platform station on the East Coast mainline, with 70 car parking spaces and a new access road to the station. The station itself will be fully accessible with lifts and a footbridge connecting both platforms.

Work from now until the end of June will see the creation of embankments for, and the start of construction work on the new platforms, drainage built on the new access road and pilling to support the installation of new signalling and overhead line equipment.

Jerry Dickson, Operations Manager, BAM Nuttall said: ‘We’re delighted to be underway in creating another brand new station for Scotland’s Railway. BAM has a proud history in delivering new rail infrastructure in the Scottish Borders and we’re looking forward to helping even more of the region to access rail transport.’

Alex Hynes, Managing Director of Scotland’s Railway said: ‘It is great to see work on Reston station getting underway as we are committed to working alongside the Scottish Government to open up our railway to as many communities as possible across Scotland. This station will create new social and economic opportunities for people in Reston and the surrounding communities and we will work hard to deliver the new facility for the area as quickly as possible. It is an exciting development that has the potential to transform life for local people and the communities it will serve.’